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The impact of neighbourhood on the income and mental health of British social renters

Carol Propper, Simon Burgess (), Anne Bolster, George Leckie, Kelvyn Jones and Ron Johnston

The Centre for Market and Public Organisation from Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK

Abstract: This paper examines the impact of neighbourhood on the income and mental health of individuals living in social housing in the United Kingdom. We exploit a dataset that is representative and longitudinal to match people to their very local neighbourhoods. Using this, we examine the effect of living in a neighbourhood in which the population is more disadvantaged on the levels and change, over a 10-year window, of income and mental health. We find that social renters who live with the most disadvantaged individuals as neighbours have lower levels of household income and poorer mental health. However, neighbourhood appears to have no impact on changes in either household income or individual mental health.

Keywords: Neighbourhood effects; income; mental health; social renters (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I30 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea, nep-soc and nep-ure
Date: 2006-05
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http://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/CMPO/workingpapers/wp161.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: The Impact of Neighbourhood on the Income and Mental Health of British Social Renters (2007) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:bri:cmpowp:06/161

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