EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Turning Qualitative into Quantitative Evidence: A Well-Used Method Made Explicit

A. W. Carus and Sheilagh Ogilvie

Cambridge Working Papers in Economics from Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge

Abstract: Many historians now reject quantitative methods as inappropriate to understanding past societies. It is argued here, however, that no sharp distinction between qualitative and quantitative concepts can be drawn, as almost any concept used to describe a past society is implicitly quantitative. Many recent advances in understanding have been achieved by deriving quantitative evidence from qualitative evidence, and using it jointly and dialectically with the qualitative evidence from which it is derived. Its reliability as quantitative evidence can be improved by indexing it against other quantitative evidence from the same community or population during the same period. We suggest that this triangulation method can be extended to many apparently qualitative types of sources that have not previously been used in this way. The potential of turning qualitative into quantitative evidence, then, despite its successes over the past decades, has hardly begun to be exploited.

Keywords: quantitative methods; qualitative methods; methodology; economic history; local studies; case studies; cliometrics (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: A12 B40 C10 C80 J10 N01 N30 N90 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 45
Date: 2005-03
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hpe and nep-pke
Note: EH
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/research-files/repec/cam/pdf/cwpe0512.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cam:camdae:0512

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Cambridge Working Papers in Economics from Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Jake Dyer ().

 
Page updated 2024-02-23
Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:0512