EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

How to Get the Snowball Rolling and Extend the Franchise: Voting on the Great Reform Act of 1832

Toke Aidt () and Raphael Franck ()

Cambridge Working Papers in Economics from Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge

Abstract: This paper suggests a new approach to analyze the causes of franchise extension. Based on a new dataset, it provides a detailed econometric study of the Great Reform Act of 1832 in the United Kingdom. The econometric analysis yields four main results. First, modernization theory only receives mixed support. Second, the reform enjoyed some measure of popular support. Third, the threat of revolution had an asymmetric impact on the voting behavior of the pro-reform Whigs and the anti-reform Tories. While the threat might have convinced reluctant reformers among the Whig politicians – and among their patrons – to support the bill, it seems to have hardened the resistance to reform among the Tories. Fourth, ideology played a critical role. However, it also appears that self-interest and political expedience explained the votes of many Members of Parliament.

Keywords: Franchise extension; democratization; The Great Reform Act. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D7 H1 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 24
Date: 2008-08
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-his and nep-pol
References: View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/research-files/repec/cam/pdf/cwpe0832.pdf Working Paper Version (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: How to get the snowball rolling and extend the franchise: voting on the Great Reform Act of 1832 (2013) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cam:camdae:0832

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Cambridge Working Papers in Economics from Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Jake Dyer ().

 
Page updated 2022-01-24
Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:0832