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More than Words: Leaders' Speech and Risky Behavior During a Pandemic

Nicolás Ajzenman, Tiago Cavalcanti () and Daniel Da Mata

Cambridge Working Papers in Economics from Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge

Abstract: How do political leader's words and actions affect people's behavior? We address this question in the context of Brazil by combining electoral information and geo-localized mobile phone data for more than 60 million devices throughout the entire country. We find that after Brazil's president publicly and emphatically dismissed the risks associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and advised against isolation, the social distancing measures taken by citizens in pro-government localities weakened compared to places where political support of the president is less strong, while pre-event effects are insignificant. The impact is large and robust to different empirical model specifications, and definitions of political support and events. Moreover, we find suggestive evidence that this impact is driven by localities with relatively higher levels of media penetration, municipalities with presence of active Twitter accounts, and municipalities with a larger proportion of Evangelic parishioners, a key group in terms of support for the president.

Keywords: Health; Coronavirus; Leadership; Persuasion; Risky Behavior (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D10 I31 Z13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2020-04-29
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea
Note: tvdvc2
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Citations: View citations in EconPapers (12) Track citations by RSS feed

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