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Is Cash Dead? Using Economic Concepts To Motivate Learning and Economic Thinking

Philip Gunby and Stephen Hickson ()
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Stephen Hickson: University of Canterbury, https://www.canterbury.ac.nz

Working Papers in Economics from University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance

Abstract: Economics is at its best when used to shed light on questions of interest to students. Even better if the answers are at odds with commonly held but incorrect views. The velocity of circulation is probably the most neglected concept in macroeconomics classes but it can be used to open up a discussion on the behaviour of people and why demand for money may rise or fall. It can be used to address the question “Is Cash Dead?” Despite the rise in the number of ways that people can pay without using cash, there seems to be no drop in the amount of cash people actually wish to hold. This is a puzzle and a good opportunity to get students thinking about why this might be.

Keywords: Principles of Economics; Velocity of Circulation; Cashless Society (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: A22 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 22 pages
Date: 2016-11-01
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hpe, nep-mon, nep-pay and nep-pke
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https://repec.canterbury.ac.nz/cbt/econwp/1630.pdf (application/pdf)

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Working Paper: Is Cash Dead? Using Economic Concepts To Motivate Learning and Economic Thinking (2018) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cbt:econwp:16/30

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