EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Health and Skill Formation in Early Childhood

Pietro Biroli ()

No 52 JEL Classification: J24, J13, I10, I12, I14., CHILD Working Papers Series from Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA

Abstract: This paper analyzes the developmental origins and the evolution of health, cognitive, and socio-emotional skills during early childhood, from age 0 to 5. We explicitly model the dynamic interactions of health with the child's behavior and cognitive skills, as well as the role of parental investment. A dynamic factor model corrects for the presence of measurement error in the proxy for the latent traits. Using data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), we find that children's capabilities strongly interact and build on each other: health is an important determinant of early socio-emotional development; in turn socio-emotional skills have a positive impact on the evolution of both health and cognitive functions; on the other side, the effect of cognitive abilities on health is negligible. Furthermore, all facets of human capital display a high degree of persistence. Finally, mother's investments are an important determinant of the child's health, cognitive, and socio-emotional development early in life.

Keywords: Human capital; health; early childhood; family investment; intergenerational transmission; ALSPAC. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea
Date: 2017
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.child.carloalberto.org/images/documenti/child52_2016.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Health and skill formation in early childhood (2016) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cca:wchild:52

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in CHILD Working Papers Series from Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Giovanni Bert ().

 
Page updated 2019-04-19
Handle: RePEc:cca:wchild:52