EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Does increasing compulsory education decrease or displace adolescent crime? New evidence from administrative and victimization datail

Ylenia Brilli and Marco Tonello ()

CHILD Working Papers Series from Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA

Abstract: This paper estimates the contemporaneous effect of education on adolescent crime by exploiting the implementation a reform that increases the school leaving age in Italy by one year. We find that the Reform increases the enrollment rate of all ages, but decreases the offending rate of 14-year-olds only, who are the age group explicitly targeted by the Reform. The effect mainly comes from natives males, while females and immigrants are not affected. The Reform does not induce crime displacement in times of the year or of the day when the school is not in session, but it increases violent crimes at school. By using measures of enrollment and crime, as well as data at the aggregate and individual level, this paper shows that compulsory education reforms have a crime reducing effect induced by incapacitation, but may also lead to an increase of crimes in school facilities plausibly due to a higher concentration of students.

Keywords: adolescent crime; school enrollment; crime displacement; incapacitation (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 39 pages
Date: 2017
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-edu, nep-eur, nep-law and nep-ure
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.child.carloalberto.org/images/documenti/child55_2017.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Does Increasing Compulsory Education Decrease or Displace Adolescent Crime? New Evidence from Administrative and Victimization Data (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: Does increasing compulsory education decrease or displace adolescent crime? New evidence from administrative and victimization data (2016) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cca:wchild:55

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in CHILD Working Papers Series from Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Giovanni Bert ().

 
Page updated 2021-01-13
Handle: RePEc:cca:wchild:55