EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

U.S. Security Ties With Korea and Japan: Getting Beyond Deterrence

Stephan Haggard

Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation, Working Paper Series from Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation, University of California

Abstract: Japan and Korea—the United States’ two key allies in Northeast Asia—are both advanced industrial democracies facing similar constraints from a rising China and a nuclear North Korea. One would think that trilateral cooperation would be a cinch. Yet Japan and Korea have been at each other’s throats over simmering historical issues and differing approaches to China. Forging a trilateral alliance is highly unlikely. But strengthening cooperation is possible by focusing less on the military components of the alliance—i.e., providing extended deterrence—and more on new issues such as 5G, artificial intelligence (AI), and infrastructure, which can strengthen collective capabilities and make cooperation more appealing.

Keywords: Social and Behavioral Sciences; cooperation; northeast asia; security; korea; japan; deterrence (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2021-04-10
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations:

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/9jn4m1ws.pdf;origin=repeccitec (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cdl:globco:qt9jn4m1ws

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation, Working Paper Series from Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation, University of California
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Lisa Schiff ().

 
Page updated 2024-06-27
Handle: RePEc:cdl:globco:qt9jn4m1ws