EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Resource Abundance, Poverty and Development

Erwin Bulte (), Richard Damania and Robert Deacon

University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series from Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara

Abstract: We examine the relationship between resource abundance and several indicators of human welfare. Consistent with the existing literature on the relationship between resource abundance and economic growth, we find that resource-abundant countries tend to suffer low levels of human development. While we find no support for a direct link between resources and welfare, there is an indirect link that operates through institutional quality. There are also significant differences in the effects that resources have on different measures of institutional quality. These results imply that the “resource curse” is a more encompassing phenomenon than previously considered, and that key differences exist between the effects of different resource types on various aspects of governance and human welfare.

Keywords: resource curse; human development; resource wealth and scarcity (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2003-12-01
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (4) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/66z854gv.pdf;origin=repeccitec (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Resource Abundance, Poverty and Development (2004) Downloads
Working Paper: Resource Abundance, Poverty and Development (2004) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cdl:ucsbec:qt66z854gv

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in University of California at Santa Barbara, Economics Working Paper Series from Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Lisa Schiff ().

 
Page updated 2020-12-15
Handle: RePEc:cdl:ucsbec:qt66z854gv