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Labor Market Concentration, Earnings Inequality, and Earnings Mobility

Kevin Rinz ()

CARRA Working Papers from Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau

Abstract: Using data from the Longitudinal Business Database and Form W-2, I document trends in local industrial concentration from 1976 through 2015 and estimate the effects of that concentration on earnings outcomes within and across demographic groups. Local industrial concentration has generally been declining throughout its distribution over that period, unlike national industrial concentration, which declined sharply in the early 1980s before increasing steadily to nearly its original level beginning around 1990. Estimates indicate that increased local concentration reduces earnings and increases inequality, but observed changes in concentration have been in the opposite direction, and the magnitude of these effects has been modest relative to broader trends; back-of-the-envelope calculations suggest that the 90/10 earnings ratio was about six percent lower and earnings were about one percent higher in 2015 than they would have been if local concentration were at its 1976 level. Within demographic subgroups, most experience mean earnings reductions and all experience increases in inequality. Estimates of the effects of concentration on earnings mobility are sensitive to specification.

Date: 2018-09
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https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/ ... carra-wp-2018-10.pdf First version, 2018 (application/pdf)

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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cen:cpaper:2018-10

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