EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Estimating the Impact of Low-Income Universal Service Programs

Daniel Ackerberg (), David DeRemer (), Michael H. Riordan, Gregory L. Rosston and Bradley S. Wimmer

Working Papers from U.S. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies

Abstract: This policy study uses U.S. Census microdata to evaluate how subsidies for universal telephone service vary in their impact across low-income racial groups, gender, age, and home ownership. Our demand specification includes both the subsidized monthly price (Lifeline program) and the subsidized initial connection price (Linkup program) for local telephone service. Our quasimaximum likelihood estimation controls for location differences and instruments for price endogeneity. The microdata allow us to estimate the effects of demographics on both elasticities of telephone penetration and the level of telephone penetration. Based on our preferred estimates, the subsidy programs increased aggregate penetration by 6.1% for low-income households. Our results suggest that Linkup is more cost-effective than Lifeline and that auto-enroll policies are important, which calls into question a recent FCC (2012) decision to reduce Linkup subsidies in favor of Lifeline. Our study can inform the evaluation of similar universal service policies for Internet access.

Pages: 44 pages
Date: 2013-06
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-reg
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www2.census.gov/ces/wp/2013/CES-WP-13-33.pdf First version, 2013 (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Estimating the impact of low-income universal service programs (2014) Downloads
Working Paper: Estimating the Impact of Low-Income Universal Service Programs (2013) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cen:wpaper:13-33

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from U.S. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Dawn Anderson ().

 
Page updated 2020-10-28
Handle: RePEc:cen:wpaper:13-33