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Innovation, Productivity Dispersion, and Productivity Growth

Lucia Foster (), Cheryl Grim, John Haltiwanger and Zoltán Wolf

Working Papers from U.S. Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies

Abstract: We examine whether underlying industry innovation dynamics are an important driver of the large dispersion in productivity across firms within narrowly defined sectors. Our hypothesis is that periods of rapid innovation are accompanied by high rates of entry, significant experimentation and, in turn, a high degree of productivity dispersion. Following this experimentation phase, successful innovators and adopters grow while unsuccessful innovators contract and exit yielding productivity growth. We examine the dynamic relationship between entry, productivity dispersion, and productivity growth using a new comprehensive firm-level dataset for the U.S. We find a surge of entry within an industry yields an immediate increase in productivity dispersion and a lagged increase in productivity growth. These patterns are more pronounced for the High Tech sector where we expect there to be more innovative activities. These patterns change over time suggesting other forces are at work during the post-2000 slowdown in aggregate productivity.

New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-bec, nep-eff, nep-ent, nep-ino, nep-sbm, nep-tid and nep-ure
Date: 2018-02
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https://www2.census.gov/ces/wp/2018/CES-WP-18-08.pdf First version, 2018 (application/pdf)

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Chapter: Innovation, Productivity Dispersion, and Productivity Growth (2018) Downloads
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