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Who is Afraid of the Brain Drain? A Development Economist’s View

Hillel Rapoport

CEPII Policy Brief from CEPII research center

Abstract: In “Debating Brain Drain”, Brock and Blake (2015) discuss the pros and cons of high-skill mobility prevention to curb the brain drain from developing countries from a legal and political perspective. I complement this discussion with the insights from recent economic research on brain drain, globalization and development. Two main results are emphasized: the fact that educational investments are higher when high-skill migration is not constrained, and the role of skilled diasporas in promoting the integration of migrants’ home countries into the global economy. Both results strengthen the rationale for letting skilled people go.

Keywords: Brain Drain; Migration; Globalization; Development (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: F21 F22 F63 J61 O11 O15 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-int and nep-mig
Date: 2017-02
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