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Assessing the Effects of Japanese Industrial Policy Change during the 1960s

Kozo Kiyota and Tetsuji Okazaki

No 16-004E, CIGS Working Paper Series from The Canon Institute for Global Studies

Abstract: This paper provides a systematic analysis of the effects of the industrial policy change in the 1960s in Japan. We utilize a panel of 227 manufacturing industries between 1960 and 1969. We find that on the one hand, the removal of de facto import quotas had significantly negative effects on real output, real output per establishment, and employment. On the other hand, for those industries where import quotas were removed, tariff protection was effective in maintaining real output and employment. However, this does not necessarily mean the success of industrial policy change because neither tariff protection nor the removal of quotas contributed to productivity growth. In that sense, the industrial policy change had limited effects.

New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-his
Date: 2016-03
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Working Paper: Assessing the Effects of Japanese Industrial Policy Change during the 1960s (2016) Downloads
Working Paper: Assessing the Effects of Japanese Industrial Policy Change during the 1960s (2015) Downloads
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