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The costs of keeping cool for Australians with Multiple Sclerosis

George Verikios (), Michael Summers, Rex Simmons and Zanfina Ademi

Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers from Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre

Abstract: Heat intolerance is a significant medical problem affecting people with Multiple Sclerosis. For people with MS, the costs of running their air conditioners are an additional disease-related expense that must be met on top of other out-of-pocket disease-related expenses. Using the results of the 2008 Keeping Cool Survey, we estimate the relative economic disadvantage faced by MS households in trying to keeping cool. We find that MS households spend around ten times more on keeping cool than the average Australian household. Sensitivity analysis indicates that our results are robust with respect to all key parameters, across regions and nationally. Our results suggest that energy rebates for heat intolerant persons currently in place in Victoria and Western Australia should be implemented in other Australian states and territories.

Keywords: cooling costs; economic disadvantage; energy rebates; heat intolerance; multiple sclerosis (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: I18 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea
Date: 2009-08
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Published in The Australian Economic Review, vol. 46, no. 1, 2012, pp. 45-58.

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