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An Analysis of Monetary and Macroprudential Policies in a DSGE Model with Reserve Requirements and Mortgage Lending

Michael Ben-Gad (), J. Pearlman and I. Sabuga

Working Papers from Department of Economics, City University London

Abstract: We propose a general equilibrium framework that highlights the interaction of reserve requirements and a conventional monetary policy in a model that combines endogenous housing loan defaults and financial intermediation frictions due to the costs of enforcing contracts. We use the model to examine how the interaction of these policies affect (i) the credit and business cycle; (ii) the distribution of welfare between savers and borrowers; (iii) the overall welfare objectives when monetary and macroprudential policies are optimised together or separately. We find that models with an optimised reserve ratio rule are effective in reducing the sudden boom and bust of credit and the business cycle. We also find that there are a distributive implications of the introduction of reserve ratio where borrowers gain at the expense of savers. However, there is no difference in the overall welfare results whether monetary and macroprudential policies are optimised together or separately.

Keywords: Reserve requirements; endogenous loan defaults; welfare (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2021
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cba, nep-dge, nep-fdg, nep-mac, nep-mon and nep-ure
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:cty:dpaper:21/04

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