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The contribution of health behaviors to depression risk across birth cohorts

Maria Gueltzow, Maarten J. Bijlsma, Frank J. van Lenthe and Mikko Myrskylä
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Maria Gueltzow: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany
Maarten J. Bijlsma: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany
Mikko Myrskylä: Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany

No WP-2021-017, MPIDR Working Papers from Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany

Abstract: Background: More recent birth cohorts are at a higher depression risk than cohorts born in the early twentieth century. We aimed to investigate to what extent changes in alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity and obesity, contribute to these birth cohort variations. Methods: We analyzed panel data from US adults born 1916-1966 enrolled in the Health and Retirement Study (N=163,760 person-years). We performed a counterfactual decomposition analysis by combining age-period-cohort models with g-computation. This allowed us to compare the predicted probability of elevated depressive symptoms (CES-D 8 score ≥3) in the natural course to a counterfactual scenario where all birth cohorts had the health behavior of the 1945 birth cohort. We stratified analyses by sex and race/ethnicity. Results: Depression risk of the 1916-1949 and 1950-1966 birth cohort would be on average 2% (-2.3 to -1.7) and 0.5% (-0.9 to -0.1) higher had they had the alcohol consumption levels of the 1945 cohort. In the counterfactual with the 1945 BMI distribution, depression risk is on average 2.1% (1.8 to 2.4) higher for the 1916-1940 cohorts and 1.8% (-2.2 to -1.5) lower for the 1950-1966 cohorts. We find no cohort variations in depression risk for smoking and physical activity. The contribution of alcohol is more pronounced for Whites than for other race/ethnicity groups, and the contribution of BMI more pronounced for women than for men. Conclusion: Increased obesity levels exacerbated depression risk in recent birth cohorts in the US, while drinking patterns only played a minor role.

Keywords: USA; behavior; cohort analysis; mental health (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J1 Z0 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 26 pages
Date: 2021
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-his
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https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.10.06.21264610v1%20 (text/html)

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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2021-017

DOI: 10.4054/MPIDR-WP-2021-017

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