EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The Effects of Labor Supply Shocks on Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Hani Mansour ()

No 1014, Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin from DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research

Abstract: Since September 2000, as a result of mobility restrictions, the supply of Palestinian workers competing for local jobs in the West Bank has increased by about fifty percent. This paper takes advantage of this unique natural experiment to study the effects of labor supply shocks on labor market outcomes. Using quarterly information on wages and employment in each city in the West Bank, the paper analyzes the short-run adjustment of labor markets to a large inflow of workers separately from the effects of political instability. The results suggest that low-skilled wages are adversely affected by an increase in the supply of low- and high-skilled workers, while high- skilled wages are only weakly negatively related to an increase in their own supply. This is consistent with a scenario in which high skilled workers compete for low skilled jobs, pushing the low skilled into unemployment. This latter hypothesis is confirmed by analyzing the effects of changes in labor supply on unemployment.

Keywords: Immigration; Labor Supply Shocks; Border Controls (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J61 J21 D74 C21 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-lab and nep-mig
Date: 2010
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (35) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.357345.de/dp1014.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: The effects of labor supply shocks on labor market outcomes: Evidence from the Israeli-Palestinian conflict (2010) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1014

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin from DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Bibliothek ().

 
Page updated 2019-04-20
Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp1014