EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Some Key Differences between a Happy Life and a Meaningful Life

Roy F. Baumeister, Kathleen D. Vohs, Jennifer L. Aaker and Emily N. Garbinsky
Additional contact information
Roy F. Baumeister: FL State University
Kathleen D. Vohs: University of MN
Jennifer L. Aaker: Stanford University
Emily N. Garbinsky: Stanford University

Research Papers from Stanford University, Graduate School of Business

Abstract: Being happy and finding life meaningful overlap, but there are important differences. A large survey revealed multiple differing predictors of happiness (controlling for meaning) and meaningfulness (controlling for happiness). Satisfying one's needs and wants increased happiness but was largely irrelevant to meaningfulness. Happiness was largely present-oriented, whereas meaningfulness involves integrating past, present, and future. For example, thinking about future and past was associated with high meaningfulness but low happiness. Happiness was linked to being a taker rather than a giver, whereas meaningfulness went with being a giver rather than a taker. Higher levels of worry, stress, and anxiety were linked to higher meaningfulness but lower happiness. Concerns with personal identity and expressing the self-contributed to meaning but not happiness. We offer brief composite sketches of the unhappy but meaningful life and of the happy but meaningless life.

Date: 2012-10
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cbe, nep-hap, nep-hpe and nep-neu
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (2)

Downloads: (external link)
https://gsbapps.stanford.edu/researchpapers/library/RP2119.pdf
Our link check indicates that this URL is bad, the error code is: 400 Bad Request (https://gsbapps.stanford.edu/researchpapers/library/RP2119.pdf [302 Found]--> https://login.stanford.edu/idp/profile/SAML2/Redirect/SSO?SAMLRequest=fZJPb4JAEMW%2FCtm7LFJQ2QgJ1UNNbEuE9tBLs8Aomyy7dGfpn29fFJvqxevMm9%2FMe5kl8lZ2LO1to3bw0QNa57uVCtmpEZPeKKY5CmSKt4DMVixPH7fMdz3WGW11pSVxUkQwVmi10gr7FkwO5lNU8LLbxqSxtkNG6QFL3nXoouVqr03tQt3TvBFlqSXYxkXU9Mj2afacF8RZD8cIxY%2FYf4jUB6GuEaLu6HDKXkg4z%2B%2BgFgYqS%2FP8mTibdUzevXIxq2ERheEdBNN56EM096MahkK0Dxb1IEPsYaOOaBsT3%2FODiTefeLPCi1gYsWD6Rpzs7PheqFqow%2B14ylGE7KEossno6RUMnvwMApIsjyGz02JzEfttLP%2FLmiQ3k13SC%2Fq4qmNPA26zzrQU1Y%2BTSqm%2FVga4hZhMCU3Gket3SH4B&RelayState=ss%3Amem%3Ab614262e42316d33064268265f94b543fad30505688865b7c2476394a9149caa)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ecl:stabus:2119

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Research Papers from Stanford University, Graduate School of Business Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2024-07-07
Handle: RePEc:ecl:stabus:2119