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Structural Change in Russian Transition

Paul R. Gregory and Valery Lazarev ()

Working Papers from Economic Growth Center, Yale University

Abstract: This paper examines structural change in the Russian economy in 1990-2001, as measured by the changing composition of output and consumption, using international panel data sets as a frame of reference. It calculates a series of indexes to determine the extent to which the Russian economy is converging towards market economies. Although the Russian structure of output is becoming increasingly similar to that of upper-middle and the lower tier of high-income countries, the structure of Russian manufacturing is inconsistent with its income level and the extent of labor reallocation remains inadequate. Russia's pattern of consumption remains distorted due to the incomplete price liberalization.

Keywords: Post-Communist Transition; Value Added; Labor Productivity; Composition of GDP; Price Distortions (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: E20 P20 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 47 pages
Date: 2004-10
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-eff, nep-mac and nep-tra
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (5)

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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:egc:wpaper:896

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