EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Technological Diversification of U.S. Cities during the Great Historical Crises

Mathieu Steijn, Pierre-Alexandre Balland (), Ron Boschma () and David Rigby

No 1901, Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) from Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography

Abstract: Regional resilience is high on the scientific and policy agenda. An essential feature of resilience is diversifying into new activities. But, little is known about whether major economic crises accelerate or decelerate regional diversification, and whether the impact differs between specialised and diverse regions. This paper offers systematic evidence on the effects of three of the largest crises in U.S. history (the Long Depression 1873-1879, the Great Depression 1929-1934, and the Oil Crisis 1973-1975) on the development of new technological capabilities within U.S. metropolitan areas. We find that crises reduce the pace of diversification in cities and that they narrow the scope of diversification to more closely related activities. We also find that more diverse cities outperform more specialised cities in diversifying during times of crisis but more diverse cities do not have a stronger focus on less related diversification during these unsettled times.

Keywords: Technological diversification; regional resilience; major historical crises; related diversification; U.S. cities; entry of technologies; patents (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: R11 D83 O33 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-geo, nep-his, nep-tid and nep-ure
Date: 2019-01, Revised 2019-01
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://econ.geo.uu.nl/peeg/peeg1901.pdf Version January 2019 (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:egu:wpaper:1901

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) from Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2019-05-22
Handle: RePEc:egu:wpaper:1901