EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

The grandkids aren't alright: the intergenerational effects of prenatal pollution exposure

Jonathan Colmer () and John Voorheis

LSE Research Online Documents on Economics from London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library

Abstract: Evidence shows that environmental quality shapes human capital at birth with long-run effects on health and welfare. Do these effects, in turn, affect the economic opportunities of future generations? Using newly linked survey and administrative data, providing more than 150 million parent-child links, we show that regulationinduced improvements in air quality that an individual experienced in the womb increase the likelihood that their children, the second generation, attend college 40-50 years later. Intergenerational transmission appears to arise from greater parental resources and investments, rather than heritable, biological channels. Our findings suggest that within-generation estimates of marginal damages substantially underestimate the total welfare effects of improving environmental quality and point to the empirical relevance of environmental quality as a contributor to economic opportunity in the United States.

Keywords: air pollution; environmental regulation; social mobility; human capital (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: H23 J00 Q53 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 74 pages
Date: 2020-12
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-ene, nep-env and nep-lab
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (3) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/108495/ Open access version. (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: The Grandkids Aren't Alright: The Intergenerational Effects of Prenatal Pollution Exposure (2020) Downloads
Working Paper: The grandkids aren't alright: the intergenerational effects of prenatal pollution exposure (2020) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ehl:lserod:108495

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in LSE Research Online Documents on Economics from London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library LSE Library Portugal Street London, WC2A 2HD, U.K.. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by LSERO Manager ().

 
Page updated 2022-09-19
Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:108495