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From targeted private benefits to public goods: land, distributive politics and changing political conditions in Colombia

Allison L. Benson

LSE Research Online Documents on Economics from London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library

Abstract: This paper analyzes how changes in political conditions affect distributive politics. We study the case of Colombia, focusing on the strategic allocation of land in relation to the electoral cycle. Relying on over 55.000 municipality-year observations on land allocations, exogenous timing of elections and sociodemographic controls, we show that there is a political land cycle (PLC), and that this cycle is dependent on the local political conditions in place. We analyze the changes in the PLC derived from the implementation of a deep political reform that increased political competition and the fiscal and administrative capacity of the state, doing so heterogeneously across municipalities. We show that the PLC decreased by half after the reform, with this reduction being stronger in municipalities in which political competition and fiscal and administrative capacity increased the most. The heterogeneous reduction in the PLC does not appear to stem from an aggregate weakening of distributive politics, but rather, from a re-composition of the distributive politics portfolio: away from the allocation of private targeted benefits like land, and towards the strategic allocation of public goods. We discuss the incentive and capacity effects explaining this re-composition likely affecting the relative costs and benefits of different types of distributive politics resources. The results evidence the importance of understanding not only the territorial dimension of distributive politics, but also how the specific traits of resources determine distributive politics strategies and their resilience to contextual changes.

Keywords: Colombia; distributive politics; electoral cycles; land reform; political reforms; targeted benefits (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D72 D73 H41 H42 L33 Q15 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 13 pages
Date: 2021-10-01
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cdm, nep-lam, nep-mfd and nep-pol
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
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Published in World Development, 1, October, 2021, 146. ISSN: 0305-750X

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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ehl:lserod:112700

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