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Information technology, organization, and productivity in the public sector: evidence from police departments

Luis Garicano () and Paul Heaton

LSE Research Online Documents on Economics from London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library

Abstract: We examine how information technology (IT) contributes to organizational change, labor demand, and improved productivity in the public sector using a new panel data set of police departments covering 1987-2003. While IT adoption is associated with increased administrative and organizational complexity and use of more highly educated officers, IT itself does not appear to enhance crimefighting effectiveness. These results are robust to various methods for controlling for agency-level characteristics and the endogeneity of IT use. IT investments do, however, appear to improve police productivity when complemented with particular management practices–in this case, those associated with the Compstat program.

Keywords: information technology; management practices; skills; productivity; police (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: K42 L23 M5 O33 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 48 pages
Date: 2007-10
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http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/19686/ Open access version. (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Information Technology, Organization, and Productivity in the Public Sector: Evidence from Police Departments (2010) Downloads
Working Paper: Information Technology, Organization, and Productivity in the Public Sector: Evidence from Police Departments (2007) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ehl:lserod:19686

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