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Economic uncertainty, parental selection and the criminal activity of the 'children of the wall'

Arnaud Chevalier and Olivier Marie ()

LSE Research Online Documents on Economics from London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library

Abstract: We study the link between parental selection and children criminality in a new context. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, East Germany experienced an unprecedented temporary drop in fertility driven by economic uncertainty. We exploit this natural experim ent to estimate that the children from these (smaller) cohorts are 40 percent more likely to commit crimes. We show that women who gave birth at this period were negatively selected. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms reveals that emotional attachment and risk attitudes play important roles in the fertility-crime relationship. Finally, results for siblings support a causal interpretation of our findings.

JEL-codes: J13 K42 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-law
Date: 2014-01
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Related works:
Working Paper: Economic Uncertainty, Parental Selection, and the Criminal Activity of the 'Children of the Wall' (2014) Downloads
Working Paper: Economic Uncertainty, Parental Selection, and the Criminal Activity of the 'Children of the Wall' (2013) Downloads
Working Paper: Economic Uncertainty, Parental Selection, and the Criminal Activity of the "Children of the Wall" (2013) Downloads
Working Paper: Economic Uncertainty, Parental Selection, and the Criminal Activity of the 'Children of the Wall' (2013) Downloads
Working Paper: Economic uncertainty, parental selection, and the criminal activity of the 'children of the wall' (2013) Downloads
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