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Internationalized at work and localistic at home: the ‘split’ Europeanization behind Brexit

Riccardo Crescenzi, Marco Di Cataldo () and Alessandra Faggian

LSE Research Online Documents on Economics from London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library

Abstract: This paper looks at the results of the Referendum on the United Kingdom membership to the European Union in order to test the link between the internationalisation of the local economy and the openness of the local society as factors associated with the ‘Leave’ vote (Brexit). The paper compares a number of alternative explanations put forward in the public debate after the Referendum. The empirical analysis suggests that the outcome of the referendum can be linked to an increasing tension between the ever increasing internationalisation of local firms and the ‘localistic’ attitude of their employees. Brexit can be seen as the result of a process of ‘split Europeanisation’ whereby Euroscepticism is triggered by the increasing mismatch between internationalised economies (and corporate economic interests) and localistic societies (and workers’ attitudes and cultural preferences).

Keywords: Brexit; voting; FDI; trade; UK; European Union (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: D72 N44 R23 Z13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017-12-27
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-pol
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Published in Papers in Regional Science, 27, December, 2017, 97(1), pp. 117-133. ISSN: 1056-8190

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