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Who becomes an inventor in America? The importance of exposure to innovation

Alex Bell, Raj Chetty (), Xavier Jaravel (), Neviana Petkova and John van Reenen ()

LSE Research Online Documents on Economics from London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library

Abstract: We characterize the factors that determine who becomes an inventor in America by using de-identified data on 1.2 million inventors from patent records linked to tax records. We establish three sets of results. First, children from high-income (top 1%) families are ten times as likely to become inventors as those from below-median income families. There are similarly large gaps by race and gender. Differences in innate ability, as measured by test scores in early childhood, explain relatively little of these gaps. Second, exposure to innovation during childhood has significant causal effects on children's propensities to become inventors. Growing up in a neighborhood or family with a high innovation rate in a specific technology class leads to a higher probability of patenting in exactly the same technology class. These exposure effects are gender-specific: girls are more likely to become inventors in a particular technology class if they grow up in an area with more female inventors in that technology class. Third, the financial returns to inventions are extremely skewed and highly correlated with their scientific impact, as measured by citations. Consistent with the importance of exposure effects and contrary to standard models of career selection, women and disadvantaged youth are as under-represented among highimpact inventors as they are among inventors as a whole. We develop a simple model of inventors' careers that matches these empirical results. The model implies that increasing exposure to innovation in childhood may have larger impacts on innovation than increasing the financial incentives to innovate, for instance by cutting tax rates. In particular, there are many “lost Einsteins” - individuals who would have had highly impactful inventions had they been exposed to innovation

Keywords: inventor; America; innovation (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: N0 R14 J01 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 82 pages
Date: 2017-12-01
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-geo, nep-ino and nep-ure
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (17) Track citations by RSS feed

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http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/86616/ Open access version. (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Who Becomes an Inventor in America? The Importance of Exposure to Innovation (2019) Downloads
Working Paper: Who Becomes an Inventor in America? The Importance of Exposure to Innovation (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Who Becomes an Inventor in America? The Importance of Exposure to Innovation (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Who Becomes an Inventor in America? The Importance of Exposure to Innovation (2017) Downloads
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