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Do Migrants Transfer Political and Cultural Norms to Their Origin Country? Some Evidence From Some Arab Countries

Jamal Bouoiyour () and Amal Miftah

No 1098, Working Papers from Economic Research Forum

Abstract: This paper explores some political and social consequences of international migration experience and remittance receipt in the case of Arab countries using Arab Barometer survey dataset. The main idea is to address whether persons who receive international remittances or have lived in the past in democratic host countries, namely U.S (or Canada) and Europe, can act as agents of changes. Three forms of political participation are considered comprising interest in politics, electoral participation and protest demonstration. Other indicators are taken into account including the perception of economic inequality and cultural constructions of gender in Muslim societies. We find that migration and remittance receipt have a positive influence on the political participation and interest of migrants and families who remain in the country of origin and receive remittances. Moreover, our estimates show that migration experience of male migrants strengthens their likelihood to vote, to be more interested in politics, to perceive the economic inequality as well as to encourage the veiling in their home countries. However, they seem less engaged in a protest demonstration.

New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-ara, nep-cdm, nep-mig and nep-pol
Date: 2017, Revised 2017
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Published by The Economic Research Forum (ERF)

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