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Boosting Innovation and Productivity in Enterprises: What Works?

Frances Ruane () and Iulia Siedschlag ()

No EC3, Papers from Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI)

Abstract: A return to economic growth and higher employment requires growth in the number and sustainability of Irish enterprises. Innovation at enterprise level is essential for sustainability and competitiveness and plays a major role in increasing overall productivity. Understanding the determinants of enterprise innovation and how it affects productivity is important for designing effective innovation policies. The tight fiscal constraints and the urgency of achieving successful outcomes require that government policies aimed at enhancing enterprise innovation and raising productivity need to be very effective. This paper draws on recent international theoretical and empirical literature based on enterprise level data to explore four questions: Does innovation contribute to higher productivity? Which types of enterprises invest in innovation? Which enterprises have higher innovation expenditure per employee? Which types of enterprises are more likely to innovate successfully? We then look at what these findings imply for policy in relation to indigenous enterprises, whether the current policy mix is appropriate and how it might become more effective.

Keywords: Productivity (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-cse, nep-eff, nep-ent, nep-ino and nep-sbm
Date: 2011-11
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
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