EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Incentives Can Reduce Bias in Online Reviews

Ioana Marinescu (), Nadav Klein (), Andrew Chamberlain () and Morgan Smart ()

Working Papers from eSocialSciences

Abstract: Online reviews are a powerful means of propagating the reputations of products, services, and even employers. However, existing research suggests that online reviews often suffer from selection bias—people with extreme opinions are more motivated to share them than people with moderate opinions, resulting in biased distributions of reviews. Providing incentives for reviewing has the potential to reduce this selection bias, because incentives can mitigate the motivational deficit of people who hold moderate opinions. Using data from one of the leading employer review companies, Glassdoor, the paper shows that voluntary reviews have a different distribution from incentivized reviews. The likely bias in the distribution of voluntary reviews can affect workers’ choice of employers, because it changes the ranking of industries by average employee satisfaction.

Keywords: eSS; online reviews; reputations; products; services; employers; selection bias; opinions; incentives; motivational deficit; moderate opinions; employer review companies; Glassdoor; voluntary reviews; incentivized reviews; workers’ choice; ranking of industries; employee satisfaction. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018-03
Note: Institutional Papers
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (1) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://www.esocialsciences.org/Download/repecDownl ... AId=12575&fref=repec

Related works:
Working Paper: Incentives Can Reduce Bias in Online Reviews (2018) Downloads
Working Paper: Incentives Can Reduce Bias in Online Reviews (2018) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:12575

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from eSocialSciences
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Padma Prakash ().

 
Page updated 2022-01-20
Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:12575