EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Demand for Slant: How Abstention Shapes Voters? Choice of News Media

Santiago Oliveros and Felix Vardy ()

Economics Discussion Papers from University of Essex, Department of Economics

Abstract: Political commentators warn that the fragmentation of the modern media landscape induces voters to withdraw into ?information cocoons? and segregate along ideological lines. We show that the option to abstain breaks ideological segregation and generates ?cross-over? in news consumption: voters with considerable leanings toward a candidate demand information that is less biased toward that candidate than voters who are more centrist. This non-monotonicity in the demand for slant makes voters? ideologies non-recoverable from their choice of news media and generates disproportionate demand for media outlets that are centrist or only moderately biased. It also implies that polarization of the electorate may lead to ideological moderation in news consumption. Thus, our results cast doubt on the oft-prophesied, imminent demise of mainstream media and may help to explain recent empirical findings showing less ideological segregation in news consumption than predicted by extant theories.

Date: 2013
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (4) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://repository.essex.ac.uk/8986/ original version (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Demand for Slant: How Abstention Shapes Voters' Choice of News Media (2015) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:esx:essedp:8986

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
Discussion Papers Administrator, Department of Economics, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester CO4 3SQ, U.K.
http://www.essex.ac. ... /papers-request.aspx

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Economics Discussion Papers from University of Essex, Department of Economics Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Essex Economics Web Manager ().

 
Page updated 2023-01-18
Handle: RePEc:esx:essedp:8986