EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Assessing the empirical relevance of Walrasian labor frictions to business cycle fluctuations

Joao Madeira ()

No 1304, Discussion Papers from University of Exeter, Department of Economics

Abstract: This paper describes and estimates (with a Bayesian likelihood approach) an otherwise standard dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model, with both sticky prices and wages, augmented with several labor market rigidities (of a Walrasian nature), namely: indivisible labor, predetermined straight time employment numbers (in which case, firms adjust overtime employment to respond to unexpected shocks), hiring expenses and convex adjustment costs. The results show all these frictions to be empirically important. Labor frictions are shown to have important implications to business cycle dynamics and economic policy making. Labor frictions imply TFP shocks have a greater role in accounting for business cycle dynamics. Labor frictions also imply fiscal policy to lead to a greater crowding out of private sector activity and monetary policy to be more e¤ective in achieving disinflation.

Keywords: DSGE; New Keynesian, labor frictions; indivisible labor; labor adjustment costs; overtime; employment; hours. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: E20 E24 E30 E31 E32 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2013
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dge and nep-mac
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://people.exeter.ac.uk/RePEc/dpapers/DP1304.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:exe:wpaper:1304

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Discussion Papers from University of Exeter, Department of Economics Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Jingnan (Cecilia) Chen ().

 
Page updated 2021-05-16
Handle: RePEc:exe:wpaper:1304