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Corporate Social Responsibility and Traditional Practices Recognized as Violence Against Women in Nigeria’s Oil Region

Joseph Uduji (), Elda Okolo-Obasi () and Simplice Asongu ()
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Joseph Uduji: University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria
Elda Okolo-Obasi: University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

No 21/034, Working Papers from European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS)

Abstract: We examine the impact of multinational oil companies’ (MOCs’) corporate social responsibility (CSR) on traditional practices recognized as violence against women and girls (VAWG) in Nigeria’s oil region. Results from the use of a combined propensity score matching and logit model indicate that MOCs’ CSR play a significant role in empowering women and girls with information and education to protect their human rights. This implies that CSR offers an opportunity for MOCs to help address prevalence of child early and forced marriage, female genital mutilation/cutting, sex trafficking, virginity testing, and taboos through a business case for stakeholders’ human right protection.

Keywords: Corporate social responsibility; Multinational oil companies; Traditional practices; Nigeria. (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 27
Date: 2021-01
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Forthcoming: Development in Practice

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http://publications.excas.org/RePEc/exs/exs-wpaper ... erias-Oil-region.pdf Revised version, 2021 (application/pdf)

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Working Paper: Corporate Social Responsibility and Traditional Practices Recognized as Violence Against Women in Nigeria’s Oil Region (2021) Downloads
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