EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Does E-governance reduce income inequality in sub-Saharan Africa? Evidence from a dynamic panel

Toyo Dossou (), Emmanuelle Kambaye (), Mesfin Berhe and Simplice Asongu
Additional contact information
Toyo Dossou: Chengdu, China.
Emmanuelle Kambaye: Chengdu, China.

No 22/066, Working Papers from European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS)

Abstract: The ICT-income inequality relationship and the governance quality-income inequality nexus have been investigated in recent years. However, the moderating effect of ICT on the governance quality-income inequality linkage has been largely ignored. To fill this gap in the literature, this study examines the moderating effect of ICT on the relationship between governance quality and income inequality for a panel of 42 sub-Saharan African economies over the period 1996-2020. To achieve this goal, the generalized method of moments (GMM) estimation technique has been adopted. The results reveal that while ICT contributes to the improvement of income distribution, governance quality contributes to the exacerbation of income inequality. Interestingly, the results unveil that the promotion of E-governance could contribute to improve social welfare and reduce income inequality. ICT thresholds at which the positive incidence of governance on income inequality is completely nullified is for governance effectiveness and 19.7 for regulatory quality. Policy implications are given based on the findings of this study.

Keywords: ICT; governance quality; income inequality; GMM; sub-Saharan Africa (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 37
Date: 2022-01
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-afr and nep-ict
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations:

Downloads: (external link)
http://publications.excas.org/RePEc/exs/exs-wpaper ... b-Saharan-Africa.pdf Revised version, 2022 (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Does E-governance reduce income inequality in sub-Saharan Africa? Evidence from a dynamic panel (2022) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:exs:wpaper:22/066

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS)
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Anutechia Asongu Simplice ().

 
Page updated 2024-04-16
Handle: RePEc:exs:wpaper:22/066