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The impact of migration on earnings inequality in New England

Osborne Jackson

No 19-2, New England Public Policy Center Research Report from Federal Reserve Bank of Boston

Abstract: Migration plays an important role in the New England economy; absent immigration, the region?s population and workforce would have shrunk in recent years. Yet increasingly, immigrant inflows have been met with legislative opposition at both the national and regional levels, motivated in part by concerns that immigration may be an important factor driving the marked rise in earnings inequality. The research findings presented in this report, however, indicate that immigration accounts for a very small portion?only 6.0 percent?of the rising earnings inequality that the region has experienced. These results suggest that policymakers interested in responding to increased inequality should pursue avenues other than immigration reform.

Keywords: New England; immigration; NEPPC; inequality (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 26 pages
Date: 2019-06-01
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-int, nep-mig and nep-ure
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