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On the welfare gains of reducing the likelihood of economic crises

Satyajit Chatterjee () and P. Dean Corbae ()

No 15, Working Papers (Old Series) from Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland

Abstract: The authors seek to measure the potential benefit of reducing the likelihood of economic crises (defined as Depression-style collapses of economic activity). Based on the observed frequency of Depression-like events, they estimate this likelihood to be approximately one in every 83 years for the U.S. The welfare gain of reducing even this small probability of crisis to zero can range between 1.05 percent and 6.59 percent of annual consumption in perpetuity. These large gains occur because although the probability of entering a Depression-like state is small, once the state is entered it is highly persistent. The authors also find that for some calibrations of the model, uninsured unemployment risk contributes significantly to the size of the gains.

Keywords: Financial crises; Business cycles; Depressions (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2000, Revised 2000
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