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The Declining U.S. Reliance on Foreign Investors

Thomas Klitgaard and Preston Mui

No 20140820, Liberty Street Economics from Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Abstract: The United States has been borrowing from the rest of the world since the mid-1980s. From 2000 to 2008, this borrowing averaged over $600 billion per year, which translates into U.S. spending exceeding income by almost 5.0 percent of GDP. Borrowing fell during the recent recession, as would be expected, and then rebounded with the recovery. Since 2011, however, borrowing has trended down and fell to 2.4 percent of GDP in 2013, the smallest amount as a share of GDP since 1997. A reduced dependency on foreign funds can be viewed as a favorable development to the extent that it reflects an improvement in the fiscal balance to a more easily sustainable level. However, it also reflects the lackluster recovery in residential investment, which is one reason the economy has yet to get back to its full operating potential.

Keywords: U.S.; borrowing; current; account; gross; saving; investment; spending (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: F00 E2 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2014-08-20
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-mac
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