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Some Places are Much More Unequal than Others

Jaison R. Abel and Richard Deitz
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Jaison R. Abel: National Regulatory Research Institute (Ohio State University)

No 20191007, Liberty Street Economics from Federal Reserve Bank of New York

Abstract: Economic inequality in the United States is much more pronounced in some parts of the country than others. In this post, we examine the geography of wage inequality, drawing on our recent Economic Policy Review article. We find that the most unequal places tend to be large urban areas with strong economies where wage growth has been particularly strong for those at the top of the wage distribution. The least unequal places, on the other hand, tend to have relatively sluggish economies that deliver slower wage growth for high, middle, and lower wage earners alike. Many of the least unequal places are concentrated in the Rust Belt. These differences in the degree of wage inequality are tied to powerful economic forces arising from technological change and globalization, which have pushed up wages strongly for high-skilled workers in locations that have become the most unequal. Yet those same forces have kept wage growth compressed within a fairly narrow range for workers in places that are the least unequal.

Keywords: Inequality; wages; regional (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: R1 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2019-10-07
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