EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Allan Meltzer: How He Underestimated His Own Contribution to the Modern Concept of a Central Bank

Robert L. Hetzel

No 18-2, Working Paper from Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond

Abstract: In his great work A History of the Federal Reserve System, vol. 1, Allan Meltzer contended that monetary policymakers in the Depression simply ignored the quantity theoretic prescriptions that would have prevented contractionary monetary policy. Practically, he was arguing that the Fed should have accepted the responsibilities for economic stabilization now taken for granted with the modern concept of a central bank. In reality, decades of monetarist criticism had to pass before the Fed accepted both responsibility for the behavior of the price level and economic stabilization. In effect, Meltzer?s contention about the self-evident truth of quantity theory ideas ignored the monumental task that lay ahead for the monetarists.

Keywords: federal reserve system; central bank; monetary policy (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: E5 N2 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 11 pages
Date: 2018-01-09
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-his, nep-hpe, nep-mac and nep-mon
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://www.richmondfed.org/-/media/richmondfedorg ... 2018/pdf/wp18-02.pdf Full text (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:fip:fedrwp:18-02

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Paper from Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by ().

 
Page updated 2021-02-21
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedrwp:18-02