EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Does Public Education Expansion Lead to Trickle-Down Growth?

Sebastian Böhm, Volker Grossmann () and Thomas Steger ()

No 452, FSES Working Papers from Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Freiburg/Fribourg Switzerland

Abstract: The paper revisits the debate on trickle-down growth in view of the widely discussed evolution of the earnings and income distribution that followed a massive expansion of higher education. We propose a dynamic general equilibrium model to dynamically evaluate whether economic growth triggered by an increase in public education expenditure on behalf of those with high learning ability eventually trickles down to low-ability workers and serves them better than redistributive transfers. Our results suggest that, in the shorter run, low-skilled workers lose. They are better off from promoting equally sized redistributive transfers. In the longer run, however, low-skilled workers eventually benefit more from the education policy. Interestingly, although the expansion of education leads to sustained increases in the skill premium, income inequality follows an inverted U-shaped evolution.

Keywords: Directed Technological Change; Publicly Financed Education; Redistributive Transfers; Transitional Dynamics; Trickle-Down Growth (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: H20 J31 O30 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-dge, nep-edu, nep-fdg, nep-gro and nep-lma
Date: 2014-10-21
References: View references in EconPapers View complete reference list from CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://doc.rero.ch/record/232544/files/WP_SES_452.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
Working Paper: Does Public Education Expansion Lead to Trickle-Down Growth? (2015) Downloads
Working Paper: Does Public Education Expansion Lead to Trickle-Down Growth? (2014) Downloads
Working Paper: Does Public Education Expansion Lead to Trickle-Down Growth? (2014) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:fri:fribow:fribow00452

Ordering information: This working paper can be ordered from
http://doc.rero.ch/record/232544

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in FSES Working Papers from Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Freiburg/Fribourg Switzerland Bd de Pérolles 90, CH-1700 Fribourg. Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Ivo raemy ().

 
Page updated 2019-07-22
Handle: RePEc:fri:fribow:fribow00452