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More on Marriage, Fertility, and the Distribution of Income

Jeremy Greenwood, Nezih Guner () and J. Knkwles

Working Papers from London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics

Abstract: According to Pareto, the distribution of income depends on "the nature of the people comprising a society, on the organization of the latter, and, also, in part, on An overlapping generations model of marriage, fertility and nature of the is captured by attitudes toward marriage, divorce, fertility, and children. Singles search for mates in a marriage market. They are free to accept or reject marriage proposals. Married agents make their decisions through bargaining about work, and the quantity and quality of children. They can divorce. Social policies, such as child tax credits or child support requirements, reflect the is modeled by randomness in income, opportunities for marriage, and marital bliss.

Keywords: FETILITY; MARRIAGE; INCOME DISTRIBUTION; PUBLIC POLICY (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J12 J13 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 1999
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Journal Article: More on Marriage, Fertility, and the Distribution of Income (2003) Downloads
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