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The Effect of Prison Sentence Length on the Subsequent Employment and Earnings of Criminal Defendants

Jeffrey Kling

Working Papers from Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Public and International Affairs

Abstract: This paper examines the employment and earnings of people convicted of committing serious crimes, focusing on the effects of serving any time in prison and of the length of time served on long-term labor market outcomes. Regression analyses control directly for some of the most important factors that determine sentences (such as criminal history and offense type) and labour market outcomes (such as education, experience, demographic characteristics, and earnings history).

Keywords: LABOUR MARKET; WORKERS' EDUCATION; PRISONS (search for similar items in EconPapers)
JEL-codes: J24 K42 (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Pages: 35 pages
Date: 1999
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