EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Social distancing beliefs and human mobility: Evidence from Twitter

Simon Porcher () and Thomas Renault
Additional contact information
Thomas Renault: CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) from HAL

Abstract: We construct a novel database containing hundreds of thousands geotagged messages related to the COVID-19 pandemic sent on Twitter. We create a daily index of social distancing—at the state level—to capture social distancing beliefs by analyzing the number of tweets containing keywords such as "stay home", "stay safe", "wear mask", "wash hands" and "social distancing". We find that an increase in the Twitter index of social distancing on day t-1 is associated with a decrease in mobility on day t. We also find that state orders, an increase in the number of COVID-19 cases, precipitation and temperature contribute to reducing human mobility. Republican states are also less likely to enforce social distancing. Beliefs shared on social networks could both reveal the behavior of individuals and influence the behavior of others. Our findings suggest that policy makers can use geotagged Twitter data—in conjunction with mobility data—to better understand individual voluntary social distancing actions.

Date: 2021-03-03
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-03205158
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Published in PLoS ONE, Public Library of Science, 2021, 16 (3), pp.e0246949. ⟨10.1371/journal.pone.0246949⟩

There are no downloads for this item, see the EconPapers FAQ for hints about obtaining it.

Related works:
Journal Article: Social distancing beliefs and human mobility: Evidence from Twitter (2021) Downloads
Working Paper: Social distancing beliefs and human mobility: Evidence from Twitter (2021)
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:hal:cesptp:hal-03205158

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0246949

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) from HAL
Bibliographic data for series maintained by CCSD ().

 
Page updated 2021-07-15
Handle: RePEc:hal:cesptp:hal-03205158