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The welfare implications of climate change-related mortality: Inequality and population ethics

Marc Fleurbaey (), Aurélie Méjean (), Antonin Pottier () and Stéphane Zuber
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Marc Fleurbaey: PSE - Paris School of Economics - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique
Aurélie Méjean: CIRED - Centre International de Recherche sur l'Environnement et le Développement - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - AgroParisTech - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique
Antonin Pottier: CIRED - Centre International de Recherche sur l'Environnement et le Développement - Cirad - Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - AgroParisTech - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - Université Paris-Saclay - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) from HAL

Abstract: Climate change-related mortality may strongly affect human well-being. By reducing life expectancy, it reduces the well-being of some infividuals. This may exacerbate existing inequalities: ex-ante inequality among people in different groups or regions of the world; ex-post inequality in experienced well-being by people in the same generation. But mortality may also reduce total population size by preventing some individuals from having children. This raises the population-ethical problem of how total population size should be valued. This paper proposes a methodology to measure te welfare effects of climate change through population and inequality change. We illustrate the methodology using a climate-economy integrated assessment model involving endogenous population change due to climate change-related mortality.

Keywords: inequality; fairness; Climate change-related mortality; population ethics (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2020-03
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-env
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-03048370
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Published in 2020

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Related works:
Working Paper: THE WELFARE IMPLICATIONS OF CLIMATE-CHANGE RELATED MORTALITY: INEQUALITY AND POPULATION ETHICS (2020)
Working Paper: The welfare implications of climate change-related mortality: Inequality and population ethics (2020) Downloads
Working Paper: THE WELFARE IMPLICATIONS OF CLIMATE-CHANGE RELATED MORTALITY: INEQUALITY AND POPULATION ETHICS (2020)
Working Paper: The welfare implications of climate change-related mortality: Inequality and population ethics (2020) Downloads
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