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Urban segregation and unemployment: A case study of the urban area of Marseille – Aix-en-Provence (France)

Fanny Alivon and Rachel Guillain ()

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Abstract: In this paper, we study the effects of the spatial organization of the urban area of Marseille – Aix-en-Provence on unemployment there. More specifically, differences in the characteristics of the residential population induce urban stratification with the result that urban structure may affect the probability of employment. In order to evaluate the effects of spatial structure on unemployment, we implement a spatial probit model to reveal the employment probabilities of young adults still living with their parents. Our results support the hypothesis that living in or near a deprived neighborhood decreases the probability of employment.

Keywords: Urban segregation; Unemployment; Spatial econometrics; Spatial probit model (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2018-09
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.univ-reunion.fr/hal-02114051
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Published in Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, 2018, 72, pp.143-155. ⟨10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2017.06.004⟩

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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:hal:journl:hal-02114051

DOI: 10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2017.06.004

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