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Citizens from 13 countries share similar preferences for COVID-19 vaccine allocation priorities

Raymond Duch, Laurence Roope, Mara Violato, Mf Becerra, T. Robinson, Jean-François Bonnefon, Jorge Friedman, Peter Loewen, P. Mamidi, Alessia Melegaro, Mariana Blanco, Juan Vargas, Julia Seither, P. Candio, Ag Cruz, X. Hua, Adrian Barnett and Philip Clarke
Additional contact information
Raymond Duch: Nuffield College - University of Oxford
Mara Violato: University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital [Oxford University Hospital]
Mf Becerra: UCHILE - Universidad de Chile = University of Chile [Santiago]
T. Robinson: Durham University
Jorge Friedman: UCHILE - Universidad de Chile = University of Chile [Santiago]
Peter Loewen: University of Toronto
P. Mamidi: Ashoka University
Alessia Melegaro: Bocconi University [Milan, Italy]
P. Candio: John Radcliffe Hospital [Oxford University Hospital], University of Birmingham [Birmingham]
Ag Cruz: University of Oxford
X. Hua: The University of MelbourneParkville, VIC, Australia.
Adrian Barnett: QUT - Queensland University of Technology [Brisbane]
Philip Clarke: University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital [Oxford University Hospital], The University of MelbourneParkville, VIC, Australia.

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Abstract: How does the public want a COVID-19 vaccine to be allocated? We conducted a conjoint experiment asking 15,536 adults in 13 countries to evaluate 248,576 profiles of potential vaccine recipients that varied randomly on five attributes. Our sample includes diverse countries from all continents. The results suggest that in addition to giving priority to health workers and to those at high risk, the public favours giving priority to a broad range of key workers and to those on lower incomes. These preferences are similar across respondents of different education levels, incomes, and political ideologies, as well as across most surveyed countries. The public favoured COVID-19 vaccines being allocated solely via government programs, but were highly polarized in some developed countries on whether taking a vaccine should be mandatory. There is a consensus among the public on many aspects of COVID-19 vaccination which needs to be taken into account when developing and communicating roll-out strategies.

Keywords: COVID-19; Vaccinations; Public health; Public opinion (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2021
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea and nep-isf
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.science/hal-03347042
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (2)

Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2021, 118 (38), ⟨10.1073/pnas.2026382118⟩

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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:hal:journl:hal-03347042

DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2026382118

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