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Never the same after the first time: the satisfaction of the second-generation self-employed

Andrew Clark (), Nathalie Colombier and David Masclet ()
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Nathalie Colombier: CREM - Centre de recherche en économie et management - UNICAEN - Université de Caen Normandie - NU - Normandie Université - UR1 - Université de Rennes 1 - UNIV-RENNES - Université de Rennes - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

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Abstract: Purpose – It is known that the self-employed are generally more satisfied than salaried workers. The aim of this paper is to test whether this phenomenon is particularly found for the first-generation self-employed.Design/methodology/approach – French and British panel data are analysed, which include information on various measures of job satisfaction, and the respondent's parents' occupation. Job satisfaction regressions were run in which the first- and second-generation self-employed were distinguished between.Findings – The study finds that first-generation self-employed (those whose parents were not self-employed) are more satisfied overall than are the second-generation self-employed. The findings are consistent between the British and French data.Research limitations/implications – While the results are the same in the two countries considered, further validation work should extend the analysis across countries. While the authors are fairly sure that the second-generation self-employed do worse, they cannot precisely distinguish between comparison to one's parents, constrained occupational choice, and selection effects due to lower barriers to self-employment entry.Originality/value – The authors believe that this is one of the first papers to distinguish between types of self-employed in terms of their higher satisfaction. The finding that parents' labour force status continues to have a significant impact on their children's job satisfaction argues for a more systematic consideration of intergenerational factors in the analysis of labour markets.

Keywords: United Kingdom; self-employed workers; job satisfaction; parents; Age groups; France (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2008
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00350245
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Published in International Journal of Manpower, Emerald, 2008, 29 (7), pp.591 - 609

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Journal Article: Never the same after the first time: the satisfaction of the second-generation self-employed (2008) Downloads
Working Paper: Never the same after the first time: the satisfaction of the second-generation self-employed (2008)
Working Paper: Never the same after the first time: the satisfaction of the second-generation self-employed (2008)
Working Paper: Never the same after the first time: The satisfaction of the second-generation self-employed (2008) Downloads
Working Paper: Never the Same After the First Time: The Satisfaction of the Second-Generation Self-Employed (2008) Downloads
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