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Early-life correlates of later-life well-being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study

Andrew Clark () and Tom Lee
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Tom Lee: Institute for Fiscal Studies

PSE-Ecole d'économie de Paris (Postprint) from HAL

Abstract: We here use data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS) to provide one of the first analyses of the distal (early-life) and proximal (later-life) correlates of older-life subjective well-being. Unusually, we have two distinct measures of the latter: happiness and eudaimonia. Even after controlling for proximal covariates, outcomes at age 18 (IQ score, parental income and parental education) remain good predictors of well-being over 50 years later. In terms of the proximal covariates, mental health and social participation are the strongest predictors of both measures of well-being in older age. However, there are notable differences in the other correlates of happiness and eudaimonia. As such, well-being policy will depend to an extent on which measure is preferred.

Keywords: Life-course; Well-being; Eudaimonia; Health; Happiness (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2021-01
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-02973079
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Published in Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 2021, 181, pp.360-368. ⟨10.1016/j.jebo.2017.11.013⟩

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Journal Article: Early-life correlates of later-life well-being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (2021) Downloads
Working Paper: Early-life correlates of later-life well-being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (2021)
Working Paper: Early-life correlates of later-life well-being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (2018)
Working Paper: Early-life correlates of later-life well-being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (2018)
Working Paper: Early-Life Correlates of Later-Life Well-Being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Early-life correlates of later-life well-being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Early-life correlates of later-life well-being: evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Early-life correlates of later-life well-being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Early-life correlates of later-life well-being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Early-Life Correlates of Later-Life Well-Being: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (2017) Downloads
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Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:hal:pseptp:halshs-02973079

DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2017.11.013

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