EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Globalisation and national trends in nutrition and health -a grouped fixed-effects approach to inter-country heterogeneity

Lisa Oberländer, Anne-Célia Disdier () and Fabrice Etilé ()
Additional contact information
Lisa Oberländer: PSE - Paris School of Economics - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement, PJSE - Paris Jourdan Sciences Economiques - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement

PSE Working Papers from HAL

Abstract: Using a panel dataset of 70 countries spanning 42 years (1970-2011), we investigate the distinct effects of social globalisation and trade openness on national trends in markers of diet quality (supplies of animal proteins, free fats and sugar, average body mass index – BMI – and diabetes prevalence). Our key methodological contribution is the application of a grouped fixed-effects (GFE) estimator, which extends linear fixed-effects models. The GFE estimator partitions our sample into distinct groups of countries in order to control for time-varying unobserved heterogeneity that follows a group-specific pattern. We find that increasing social globalisation has a significant impact on the supplies of animal protein and sugar available for human consumption, as well as on mean BMI. Specific components of social globalisation such as information flows (via television and the Internet) drive these results. Trade openness has no effect on dietary outcomes or health. These findings suggest that the social and cultural aspects of globalisation should receive greater attention in research on the nutrition transition.

Keywords: trade openness; grouped fixedeffects; nutrition transition; obesity; social globalisation; panel data (search for similar items in EconPapers)
Date: 2017-05
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-hea and nep-int
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01400829v2
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: View citations in EconPapers (14) Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01400829v2/document (application/pdf)

Related works:
Journal Article: Globalisation and national trends in nutrition and health: A grouped fixed‐effects approach to intercountry heterogeneity (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Globalisation and national trends in nutrition and health: A grouped fixed-effects approach to intercountry heterogeneity (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Globalisation and national trends in nutrition and health: A grouped fixed-effects approach to intercountry heterogeneity (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Globalisation and national trends in nutrition and health -a grouped fixed-effects approach to inter-country heterogeneity (2017) Downloads
Working Paper: Globalisation and national trends in nutrition and health - a grouped fixed effects approach to inter-country heterogeneity (2016) Downloads
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:hal:psewpa:halshs-01400829

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in PSE Working Papers from HAL
Bibliographic data for series maintained by CCSD ().

 
Page updated 2021-05-30
Handle: RePEc:hal:psewpa:halshs-01400829