EconPapers    
Economics at your fingertips  
 

Reporting Bias in Studies of the Food Stamp Program

Bruce Meyer and James Sullivan ()

No 801, Working Papers from Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago

Abstract: Benefit receipt in major household surveys is often underreported. This understatement has major implications for our understanding of the economic circumstances of disadvantaged populations and the distributional effects of government programs. This paper examines underreporting of food stamps by combining administrative microdata for the Food Stamp Program (FSP) and nationally representative survey data. We provide a new econometric method for estimating the determinants of reporting that uses two data sources with overlapping demographic characteristics rather than requiring matched individual data. This method compares the characteristics of those who report receipt in the survey to the characteristics of recipients in the administrative data to determine the influence of those characteristics on reporting. Our estimates using this two sample estimation procedure indicate that observable characteristics are related to underreporting. We then show how these results can be used to correct for underreporting bias in studies of FSP participation or the distributional effects of the FSP. Our results also have implications for studies that use FSP receipt as an explanatory variable.

Keywords: food stamp; reporting bias; poverty (search for similar items in EconPapers)
New Economics Papers: this item is included in nep-agr
Date: 2008-01
References: Add references at CitEc
Citations: Track citations by RSS feed

Downloads: (external link)
http://harrisschool.uchicago.edu/about/publication ... ers/pdf/wp_08_01.pdf (application/pdf)

Related works:
This item may be available elsewhere in EconPapers: Search for items with the same title.

Export reference: BibTeX RIS (EndNote, ProCite, RefMan) HTML/Text

Persistent link: https://EconPapers.repec.org/RePEc:har:wpaper:0801

Access Statistics for this paper

More papers in Working Papers from Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago Contact information at EDIRC.
Bibliographic data for series maintained by Eleanor Cartelli (). This e-mail address is bad, please contact .

 
Page updated 2019-10-16
Handle: RePEc:har:wpaper:0801